Orange White Chocolate Currant Oatmeal Cookies

Orange White Chocolate Currant Oatmeal Cookies

Here is yet another cookie recipe adaptation that I have gleaned from Elizabeth Prueit’s TARTINE cookbook. This time around it is a batch of wonderfully soft oatmeal cookies with chunks of white chocolate, plump currants, orange zest, and a hint of vanilla and nutmeg. I have to say there is an insightful playfulness to Elizabeth’s recipes that have me returning to her cookbook time and time again. Leafing through TARTIN’s pages is as much about being inspired as it is about having confidence in knowing you will come away with some amazing cookies that you know everyone will love!

 

Big Orange -White Chocolate – Oatmeal– Currant -Cookies         makes 24 to 36 cookies 

  • 12 oz / 340 g white chocolate, chopped into 1/8 inch pieces
  • 1 ½ cups currants, soaked in warm water until plumped, and drained
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 cup/ 8 oz unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 ¼ cups sugar
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp dark molasses
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 4 tsp freshly grated orange zest
  • 2 tbsp fresh squeezed orange juice
  • 1 ½ cups old- fashioned rolled oats

Preheat oven to 350 f/ 180 c

Have ready 3 cookie sheets lined with parchment paper or non-stick liner.

Sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and nutmeg in a bowl and set aside.

Using a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium high speed until light and creamy. Slowly add the sugar and continuing beating until light and fluffy.

Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a silicone spatula. Add the whole egg, egg yolk, vanilla, molasses, salt, orange zest, and orange juice and beat on medium low speed until well mixed. Add the flour mixture and mix until combined. Stop the mixer and add the currants and the rolled oats and fold them in using the silicone spatula until well combined.

Have ready a small bowl of water.

For big cookies scoop out the dough into 3 ½ oz / 100 g portions. Roll portioned dough into balls and set aside on a platter.

If you want to make smaller cookies scoop out 2 ¾ oz/ 75 g portions of dough. Baking time will be 7 to 10 minutes.

For best results you want to bake 6 large cookies on each baking sheet. This allows for even baking and ample space for the cookies to spread out as they bake.

Position six pieces of dough on the lined baking sheet. Dip your fingers into the bowl of water and then gently press the dough out into about 3 inch rounds. Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and bake for 10 to 12 minutes. The cookies should be slightly browned around the edges while the centers will still feel a little soft.

Promptly transfer baking sheet with the cookies to a wire cooling rack. After about 5 minutes you can slide the parchment or liner with the cookies from the baking sheet to the cooling rack. The cookies will firm up as they cool. Be sure the cookies are cooled to room temperature before serving or transferring them to an airtight container for storage.

Continue baking batches of cookies until all the cookies are baked and cooled to room temperature.
Store in airtight containers fora couple of weeks. I you decide to refrigerate the cookies for longer storage be sure to bring them to room temperature for serving.

Dia de los Muertos Mole de Olla con Pollo y Chorizo

Dia de los Muertos Mole de Olla con Pollo y Chorizo

Dia de los Muertos, Day of the Dead, is a uniquely Mexican holiday that celebrates the lives of the dead on the 1st and 2nd of November every year. The origins are attributed to Aztec animist beliefs combined with Catholicism, the dates coinciding with the Catholic All Saints Day and All Souls Day. Contrary to what you may think, Dia de Los Muertos is a joyous familial occasion that is celebrated with food, drink, music, and entertainment in homes and in grave yards throughout Mexico, Latin America, and in parts of North America where there are Latin American communities.

The imagery of vividly decorated skulls (calaveras) and dancing skeletons (calacas) associated with Dia de los Muertos was popularized by Mexico’s most famous graphic artist Jose Guadalupe Posada in the mid 1800’s. His work influenced a whole new generation of famous Mexican muralists and painters that followed him including Diago Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, and Frida Kahlo.

Popular Dia de Los Muertos foods include typical Mexican favorites that are prepared ahead of the celebrations and served throughout the day and night, and often into the wee hours of the morning. Frijoles de olla and moles de Olla, are popular clay pot meals that include various meats, vegetables, chiles, and of course beans. Typically cooked over a fire or slowly braised in the oven as I have done for the recipe that follows. The mole is then tucked into warm tortillas,  topped with picante salsas, and served with a chunky guacamole. Essentially you have a hearty meal in hand and the mole de olla will hold up until the last of the revelers eventually wend their way home as the sun rises!

For some more Dia de Los Muertos recipes, click on the following links. 

Sopa de Maize y chile Verde con Pollo (click here) 

Mexican Roasted Pumpkin Soup; sopa de Calabezza (click here)

 

 

Dia de Los Muertos   Mole de Olla con Pollo y Chorizo          Serves 6 to 8

  • 2 pounds skinless chicken breasts, sliced into plump strips
  • 2 pounds Mexican chorizo, divided 
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil + more as needed
  • 3 large onions, peeled, quartered and thinly sliced
  • 2 large green bell peppers, seeded and cut into strips
  • 2 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into strips
  • 4 to 6 green or ripe red jalapeno chiles, seeded and cut into strips
  • 8 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 4 ribs celery, diced 
  • 1½ teaspoon toasted cumin seeds
  • 1 ½ teaspoons dried Mexican oregano
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves
  • 1 cup tequila
  • 6 cups cooked black beans (or canned)
  • 1 quart hot chicken stock
  • 2 tablespoons pure ground red chile powder
  • pinch of ground clove
  • salt to taste
  • chopped cilantro leaves
  • flour tortillas, warmed
  • fresh crumbled cotija cheese (or mild feta)
  • fresh cilantro leaves
  • chunky guacamole

Choose a large wide pan with a lid that will fit on the oven wrack set in the middle positioned of the oven.

Preheat the oven to 325 f/ 160 c

Place the pan on the stove top over medium high flame. When the pan is hot add some oil. When the oil is nearly smoking add the chicken pieces and seer until the chicken is nicely browned and releases from the pan easily. Turn the chicken and seer until nicely browned. Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside on a large platter.

Add the chorizo to the pan and seer until the skin is deeply browned and releases easily from the pan. Turn the chorizo and seer until deeply browned. Remove the chorizo from the pan and place it in the platter with the chicken.

Add a little more oil to the pan if needed. When nearly smoking add the onions and saute while deglazing the pan as the onions begin to soften. Promptly add the green and red bell pepper and saute until the onions and peppers have wilted. Add the garlic and celery and cook another two or three minutes. Then add the jalapenos and saute while tossing until the contents are evenly combined.

Pour in the tequila and stir continuously until the tequila is nearly absorbed into the vegetable mixture. Add the cumin seeds, oregano, and marjoram and toss until evenly distributed into the mixture.

At this point return the browned chicken and chorizo to the pan and add the beans. Stir to combine and then add the stock to just cover and stir. Cover the pan with the lid and place it in the center of the oven. Braise for 1 hour undisturbed.

Open the oven and transfer the pan to the stove top. Remove the lid and stir in the red chile powder, ground clove, and chopped cilanto . Stir to combine and then season with salt to taste. If the mole is looking dry add more stock as needed.

Cover the [pan and return it to the oven to keep warm while warm the flour tortillas, assemble assorted salsas, and make the chunky guacamole.

Serving:

Stack the warmed tortillas in a basket lined with a kitchen towel to keep them warm.

Place your salsas of choice on the table along with the guacamole.

Remove the pan from the oven.

Place a warm tortilla on a plate and spoon a generous portion of the mole de olla just off center. Scatter some crumbled cotija cheese, or feta, over the meats and vegetables and garnish with fresh cilantro leaves. Serve open faced so salsa can be added before folding the tortilla for eating.

The beauty of the chunky guacamole is it is easily forked and eaten along with bites of the filled tortilla.

Chunky guacamole

  • 4 Haas (bumpy skinned) ripe avocados
  • 1 onion, peeled and finely diced
  • 2 to 4 serrano chiles, stem and seeds removed, and minced
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt + more to taste
  • 1/3 cup freshly chopped cilantro leaves
  • fresh lime juice to taste
  • olive oil for drizzling

Slice the avocados in half lengthwise and remove the pits. Crosshatch each half of the avocado and then slice the hatches in half lengthwise. Gently remove the chunks of avocado and place them in a chilled bowl.

Place the diced onions, minced serrano chiles, and sea salt in a mortar. Crush and grind the ingredients with the pestle into a moist paste.

Scrape the paste over the avocado chunks and add the chopped cilantro leaves. Spritz fresh lime juice over all and then drizzle with just a little olive oil. Toss gently until the paste is evenly spread over the avocado chunks. Taste and add more salt and lime juice to taste.

Chill the chunky guacamole until just before serving.

Black Walnut Cake

Black Walnut Cake

Martha was my next door neighbor when I was growing up in rural Lancaster County Pennsylvania. I didn’t know much about cooking back then, but we kids always enjoyed having lunches together in Martha’s kitchen. The radio was always on and supper preparations were usually already well under way with wonderful aromas wafting over the kitchen table. The whole idea of cooking and the pleasures of those long gone lunches have lingered and helped shape in their own way my own passion for food and cooking.

Every fall, October-November, we kids would help Martha collect the walnuts that fell from the black walnut trees in front of our houses. To us they looked like leathery decomposing green balls with an intense acrid odor that were begging to be thrown at one another. Black walnut trees are native to North America as apposed to the milder English walnut trees that produce larger nuts that are commonly found in the shops. Shelled black walnuts are smaller and have a more intense walnut flavor. I urge you to seek them out. If you don’t have a source where you live they are available on line. If that is not an option, toasted English walnuts will do in a pinch, though there really is no comparison.

Once the walnuts were gathered they were put in an oblong rectangular wooden tray with a wire mesh screen bottom. The walnuts were then put up to cure until the green skin blackened and was soft enough to pull away revealing the hard black walnut inside. This was a very messy business and wearing rubber gloves was a must to avoid badly stained hands.

The hulled nuts were then set out to dry for several days before cracking the shells with a hammer and meticulously removing the walnut’s meat. Very tedious work that we kids usually quickly lost interest in, leaving Martha to finish the harvesting on her own.

However all of the laborious preparations paid off when digging into a slice of Martha’s gloriously delicious black walnut cake!

I make Martha’s black walnut cake every fall and revisit those fond memories from my childhood in Martha’s kitchen.

For this recipe all I have is a penciled list of Martha’s ingredients and my own recollections.


Martha’s Black Walnut Cake:

  • 4 ½ ounces / 128 grams unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 2 ½ cups flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup chopped black walnuts

Preheat the oven to 350 f/ 180 c

Prepare two well buttered 9 or 10 inch round layer cake pans, or buttered and lined with a circular parchment paper.

Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar together on medium high speed until fluffy. This may take 4 or 5 minutes.

With the mixer running add one egg at a time and mixing until fully incorporated. Add the second and third egg, again mixing each until fully incorporated.

In a bowl combine the flour, baking powder, and salt and stir until combined.

With the mixer set on low speed begin adding a third of the flour mixture alternately with an equal part of the milk and mixing until combined before adding the second and third additions of flour mixture and milk. Try not to over mix the batter so it retains its airiness.

Stop the mixer and add the walnuts. Stir the walnuts in in by hand until evenly distributed.

Spoon the cake batter evenly into the prepared cake pans. Giggle the pans slightly to even out the batter.

Transfer the pans to the oven and bake for about 20 to 25 minutes. Test by sticking a skewer into the center of the cake. If the skewer comes out clean the cake is done. Keep an eye on the timing so the cake is not over baked which will dry it out.

Transfer the cake pans to a wire rack and allow to cool to room temperature while you make the frosting.

 

Fluffy White Mountain Frosting:

Don’t be skeptical about making a cooked frosting. This is a tried and true Fannie Farmer recipe that never fails. I like the light fresh taste of this frosting that compliments the flavor of the black walnuts perfectly.

  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • ½ cup water
  • ¼ teaspoon cream of tarter
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 3 egg whites
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup chopped black walnuts

Combine the sugar, water, cream of tartar and salt in a stainless saucepan set over medium high heat. As the mixture heats up swirl the pan to mix the ingredients. Let the mixture come to a boil, swirling the pan now and again, until the mixture is completely clear- about 4 or 5 minutes. Put the lid on the pan and let cook another minute.

Uncover and attache a candy thermometer to the pan being sure the tip does not touch the bottom of the pan. Let the syrup continue to boil uncovered until the temperature reaches 240 f /115 c .

Meanwhile, using a stand mixer, beat the egg whites in the chilled bowl until stiff moist white peaks form. When the syrup is ready, continue beating at medium high speed and pouring the syrup into the egg whites in a slow steady stream. Continue beating for a couple more minutes until the frosting has cooled a little and stiff enough to stand in peaks. Beat in the vanilla.
At this point the frosting is ready for spreading.

For this cake you can frost the cake and then garnish with chopped black walnuts or simply stir the chopped walnuts into the frosting as I have done.

You will have some frosting left which you can cover and refrigerate for a week or so.

Ideally use a cake storage container for storage so the frosting is undisturbed.

Serve at room temperature!

Miso Wasabi Salad Dressing

Miso Wasabi Salad Dressing

 

The Japanese ingredients say a lot about this zesty salad  dressing, but it is surprisingly compatible when served with non-Japanese dishes as well.

As always, shop for the very freshest organic ingredients you can find. What I do love about this dressing is how the wasabi note heightens  the crisp garden fresh flavor of the assorted salad components. Perfect for late summer and fall salads!

 

Miso Wasabi Salad Dressing     Makes 3/4 cup

  • 3 tablespoons light miso
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated garlic
  • ¼ cup Japanese rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons Tamari soy sauce, or regular soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon toasted  sesame oil
  • ¼ cup light vegetable oil, or light olive  oil
  • 1 or 2 teaspoons wasabi paste
  • 3 tablespoons cold water

Combine all the ingredients except the water in a jar with a tight fitting lid. Shake vigorously until the dressing is completely emulsified. Add the cold water and shake once again until combined. Refrigerate the dressing until well chilled for serving.

 

Suggestions For the Salad

  • romaine lettuce, leaves cut into thirds
  • baby cos leaves, halved
  • radicchio leaves, torn lengthwise
  • iceberg, torn
  • arugula (rocket) leaves
  • celery leaves
  • mizuna sprigs
  • julienned carrots
  • julienned radishs
  • snap peas, blanched and chilled
  • radish sprouts
  • small vine ripe tomatoes, halved
  • toasted sesame seeds  (see recipe here)

Place the romaine, baby cos, radicchio, iceberg, arugula, and celery leaves in a large bowl and toss. Add a couple of teaspoons of dressing and toss to coat the leaves evenly.

Plating and Serving the Salad

Fan the mizuna leaves on chilled individual salad plates and mound a handful of tossed lightly dressed salad leaves onto each plate. Scatter the top of each salad with the julienned carrots and then the julienned radishes. Tuck the snap peas and halved tomatoes into the salads and lightly drizzle a little more dressing over each salad. Garnish with a flourish of toasted sesame seeds and serve.

 

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