Black Eye Peas

Black Eye Peas

Black eye Peas, also called field peas or cowpeas, are probably the most important African dietary contribution to American southern cooking. Black eye peas are actually not peas at all, but legumes that arrived in the Americas with slave ships from from West Africa. Black Eye Peas are traditionally eaten along with collard greens ( recipe click here) which has provided a nourishing food staple throughout the American south, the Caribbean, and  Central and South America since the 1690’s. Earlier varieties have thrived across  he Middle East and Asia.

Black eye pea plants are hearty and drought resistant. The peas are nutritive rich with vitamins, minerals, and protein. Prepared much like most other legumes and eaten with various local condiments, herbs, chilies, or pickled relishes. There are more collard greens and black eye peas consumed in” Hoppin John” every January first than any other day of the year here in the South. The green collards insure plenty of green backs and the black eye peas plenty of pocket change for the coming year.

Black eye peas are usually cooked with some variety of smoked pork, but are equally delicious omitting the pork and instead using smoked paprika and finely ground chipotle chile that adds a spicy smokiness to the finished dish. With a splash of cold pressed peanut oil and a spritz of lemon or lime juice just before serving, these black eye peas are sure to become a favorite choice to serve with almost any meal.

Black Eye Peas with Cod in Papapillote

Black Eye Peas with Cod in Papapillote

What I love about cooked black eye peas is their surprisingly fresh flavor not unlike young garden peas. There is nothing better than sitting down to a plate of black eye peas and a mess of collard greens to grasp the “soul” and goodness of real authentic Southern cooking.

Dried black eye peas are available in most supper markets. Spanish Smoked paprika and ground chipotle chile are available online.

Black Eye Peas      makes 2 quarts

  • 1 pound dried Black eye peas, rinsed
  • 3 tablespoons cold pressed peanut oil + more for finishing
  • 1 yellow onion, peeled and diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
  • 3 oz smoked pork or 4 strips bacon, diced (optional)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram leaves
  • 1 teaspoon ground chipotle chile 
  • 3 quarts boiled water + more as needed
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 3  teaspoons flaked (Kosher) salt + more to taste
  • lemon or lime wedges for serving

Rinse the black eye peas and set them aside to drain in a colander.

Place a stock pot on the stove top on medium heat. When hot add the 3 tablespoons of the oil and swirl the pan. Add the onions and saute for 5 minutes or until the onions are wilted. Then stir in the garlic and saute another minute. If using, add the pork or bacon and continue to saute until the meat is incorporated and the fat is beginning to render. Otherwise do as I do and omit the pork.

Add the bay leaf, marjoram, and the ground chipotle chile and saute until well combined and fragrant.

Add enough boiled water to cover the contents of the pot generously and stir to combine. Then add the dried black eye peas and stir. Add more boiled water if needed to generously cover the peas. Bring the pot back to a very low boil and cook until the black eye peas are tender, but still holding their shape. I have found that generally dried black eye peas will require a shorter cooking time than most other dried beans, so test for d oneness more frequently to avoid over cooking the peas and be sure to add more boiled water only if needed.

Once the peas are done to your liking add the smoked paprika and several teaspoons of salt. Stir to combine and simmer another 10 minutes. Then taste the broth and add more salt as needed.

Serve the black eyed peas with a drizzle of peanut oil and a spritz of lemon or lime juice.

For Poisson en Papillote (click here)

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