Shiso Pesto with Soba Noodles

 

Pesto making season has arrived!

Fresh basil varieties are abundant this time of year and what we cooks have been waiting for with unapologetic anticipation. Being able to stow away the essence of summer’s flavors into jars or bundled into the deep freeze is a task relished. Bringing some of the bright tastes of summer back to life  at the table during the long winter months is always warmly savored by one and all.

With that in mind I came home from the market with a bundle of Italian basil and, to my surprise, a bundle of Shiso . My immediate thought was a Shiso pesto!

Most of you are probably familiar with the delicate green shiso leaves garnishing sushi in Japanese restaurants. Shiso has a fresh light mint like flavor with just a hint of citrus and cinnamon. It is indeed the perfect compliment for sushi.

Shiso is the Japanese name for what we might otherwise know as perilla in the West. It is from the mint family and originates from the mountainous regions of China and India, but now cultivate worldwide. Perilla is used throughout Asia. The Japanese use shiso for pickling and coloring umeboshi plums and fermented eggplant.

There are many varieties of shiso with leaf colors ranging from pale green, a purplish red, or leaves that are green on top and red on the underside  which is what I found here in North Carolina. I do love the subtle flavor of the tender young green shiso leaves so I just had to get a large bundle of these green and red shiso leaves and see what I could do with them.

Making a Shiso pesto defers to the more subtle flavor notes of the shiso itself. What evolved was a deep purplish red pesto with notes of citrus, ginger, and mint to serve along with Japanese soba noodles. You can serve the soba noodles warm or cold along with some sauteed mushrooms. This is an ideal pairing for various mushrooms harvested during the fall months ahead.

For you pesto lovers I will be posting a  zesty Thai-Amereicano Pesto in my next post along with links to other pesto recipes I have posted over the years.

 

 

Shiso Pesto with Soba noodles and Sauteed Mushrooms

Serves 3  or  4

The sauteed mushrooms can be made in advance. See the recipe below.

  • 2 cups fully packed fresh shiso leaves, either green, reddish purple, or reddish purple & green
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • 1 tablespoon white miso
  • 1 tablespoon freshly grated (micro planed) ginger root
  • ½ cup walnut pieces
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons freshly squeezes lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons neutral vegetable or light olive oil
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • pinch of white pepper
  • a bundle  or two of  Japanese soba noodles
  • toasted sesame seeds for garnish (recipe here)

 

If your shiso leaves are mature remove the central spine of the leaves and tear the leaves before proceeding.

Place the torn shiso leaves, garlic, miso, grated ginger, the walnuts, and 2 tablespoons of lemon juice in the work bowl of a food processor. Pulse until all the ingredients are broken down. Stop the motor and scrape down the sides of the work bowl.

With the motor running ad the oil in a slow steady stream through the feed tube until the ingredients form a thick paste like mixture.

Then begin adding one tablespoon of cold water at a time until the mixture is thinned out a bit and smoother. You will have to be the judge of how much water to add, but keep in mind the texture will firm up a bit when refrigerated.

Stop the motor and add the salt and pepper and pulse until incorporated. Stop the machine and taste the pesto. At this point adding the remaining lemon juice and seasoning with more salt and pepper  to taste. Then pulsing several times.

Transfer the pesto to a non reactive bowl, cover with cling film, and refrigerate while you prepare the soba noodles and the mushrooms.

Soba Noodles

Bring a generous pot of water to a boil. Do not salt the water.

While the water is coming to a boil, fill a bowl with very cold water and set aside.

Once the water is boiling add the soba noodles and, using tongs, continuously stir the noodles for about 6 minutes. You want the noodles to be al dente! 

Promptly transfer the noodles to a colander and drain . Then tip the noodles into the bowl of cold water. Using your hands give the noodles a gentle wash. This washing will remove most residual starch so the noodles will not stick together.

Tip the noodles into a colander and drain well. The soba noodles are now ready for serving at room temperature.

If you want to serve the noodles warm, place them in a strainer and immerse them into a simmering pot of water until warm. Then toss the noodles in the strainer and transfer the noodles to a serving bowl or individual serving bowls.

Spoon some shiso pesto on top of the noodles and garnish with toasted sesame seeds. 

Serve the remaining pesto in a small bowl along with the sauteed mushrooms and light soy sauce or ponzu sauce on the table.

Sauteed mushrooms

  • 1 pint of seasonal mushrooms; cremini, shiitake, or forest mushrooms
  • 1 plump shallot,  peeled and finely diced
  • 1 tablespoon light olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 3 tablespoons sake or white wine
  • sea salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste

Brush the mushrooms well to remove any soil. Snap off the stems and reserve for another use.
Slice the mushrooms thinly and set aside.

Place a saute pan on the stove over medium heat. When the pan is hot add the oil and then the shallots and saute for several minutes until they are translucent.

Add the sliced mushrooms and toss with the mushrooms. Continue doing this until the mushrooms start to release their juices. Then add the butter and continue sauteing until the juices are mostly evaporated. Add the sake and saute until the sake is mostly evaporated. Season with salt and pepper to taste and set aside to use later.

 

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