Peter

Moo Shu Pork

Moo Shu Pork

 

Moo shu Pork originates from the north eastern province of Shandong in China. A n old traditional stir fried dish consisting of sliced pork, black mushrooms, ginger, cucumber, scallions, and day lilly buds. Seasoned with a dash of Chinese rice wine and soy sauce,then  tossed with scrambled eggs (Moo Shu), and served with rice. No Mandarin pancakes nor Hoisin sauce. That was to come later. Moo Shu Pork as most of the modern world knows it today is the American version that came along in the late 60’s.

 

But the story of Chinese food in America really began with the arrival of Chinese immigrants in California seeking their fortune during the California gold rush of 1848. The novelty of Chinese food quickly gained popularity with the locals in the Bay area and eventually caught on throughout the rest of the country. But it wasn’t until several enterprising Chinese women restaurateurs gave Chinese Cuisine a certain cache. Ruby Foo opened Ruby Foo’s Den in Boston in 1929. Cecilia Chiang opened The Mandarin restaurant in San Francisco in 1960. Pearl Wong opened Pearl’s Chinese restaurant in midtown Manhattan in 1973, and Joyce Chen popularized northern Chinese cuisine in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The rest is history. Chinese cuisine had arrived and went on to become America’s favorite ethnic cuisine.

The American version of Moo Shu Pork evolved in the late 60’s. Green cabbage replaced the unfamiliar day lilly buds. Shiitake mushrooms replaced the dried black fungus mushrooms, but most importantly Mandarin pancakes were introduced that were seasoned with Hoisin sauce, and used as wrappers stuffed with the stir fried Moo Shu Pork. A brilliant innovation that made Moo Shu Pork a favorite Chinese dish worldwide.

The recipe that follows diverges from the American stir fried version. I’ve opted for a slow cooked method that renders a soft tender“pulled” pork that has absorbed the flavors of the seasoned cabbage mixture. Rather than making Mandarin pancakes, which can be a tedious affair, I’ve opted for using store bought flour tortillas and the Hoisin sauce, both of which can be found in most grocery stores these days.

Overall this is an easy dish to prepare and perfect for a family meal or larger gatherings as it can be prepared ahead and rewarmed for serving.

 

Moo Shu Pork            serves 6

Moo Shu Pork

Moo Shu Pork

  • 1 ½ lbs / 700 g pork tenderloin (or loin)
  • 1 large head green cabbage, trimmed and thinly sliced
  • bunch of kale leaves, center rib removed, and chopped (optional)
  • 1 large onion, peeled, quartered, and thinly sliced
  • 2 inch knob fresh ginger root, peeled, and sliced into thin batons
  • 1 tablespoon 5 spice powder (see note below)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 quart stock + more as needed
  • 1 tablespoon peanut or vegetable oil
  • 6 oz/ 225 g fresh shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced
  • ½ cup white part of scallions, sliced
  • 1 cup thinly slice green scallion leaves, divided
  • 3 tablespoons Chinese Shaoxing cooking wine (or medium dry sherry)
  • light soy sauce to taste
  • 12 flour tortillas, warmed
  • Hoisin sauce

Needed, a large Dutch oven or deep roasting pan with lid.

Preheat oven to 350 f /180 c

Combine the sliced cabbage, kale (if using), onions, ginger, 5 spice powder, salt, and pepper in the Dutch oven or roasting pan and toss to combine.

Divide the pork tenderloins in half (or quarter if using loin) and push the meat down into the tossed cabbage mixture until nearly covered. Add stock to the pot until just visible around the edges.

Place the pot, uncovered, in the oven and roast for 25 minutes.

Reduce the heat to 220 f / 104 c

 Cover the pot and roast for about 2 1/2 hours. Check after 1 ½ hours and add a little more stock if needed to keep the cabbage moist and avoid scorching on the bottom of the pot and test the pork for tenderness. It should pull apart very easily. If not, return the pot to the oven and continue roasting until the pork is very tender. Three hours cooking time is usually sufficient. 

Once the pork is tender remove from the oven, uncover, and set aside to cool until you can remove the pork and pull it apart into bite size pieces. Place the pulled pork in a bowl and set aside.

To finish the Moo Shu Pork place a very large skillet over medium heat on the stove top and add the oil. When hot add the mushrooms and saute until they begin to color. Then add the garlic and the white part of the scallions and saute until softened. Then add the Chinese cooking wine (or sherry) and saute until the wine has nearly evaporated.

Add the pulled pork to the skillet and toss to combine. Then, using a slotted spoon, transfer the cabbage mixture to the pan and add half of the sliced green scallions and toss to combine. Add just enough of the remaining broth in the roasting pot to keep the pork and cabbage mixture moist. Taste and stir in soy sauce sparingly to round out the flavor.

Warm the tortillas individually in a dry skillet just briefly to soften them and make them very pliable. If you find the tortillas to be quite dry a quick misting with water before heating them works wonders. Wrap the tortillas in a kitchen towel to keep them warm.

Once the tortillas are warmed, working with one tortilla at a time, spread a thin layer of Hoisin sauce over the inner surface the tortilla and then fill with the pork and cabbage mixture as you would filling a soft taco. Scatter some green scallions over the pork filling and wrap the tortilla around the filling, closing one end as you roll as you would a taco. Place the rolled Moo Shu Pork wraps aside on a baking tray covered with a kitchen towel. You can place the tray of wraps in a very low heat oven to keep them warm until you are ready to serve.

 

Alternately, you can let everyone at the table assemble their own the Moo Shu Pork wraps which is part of the real fun of this dish.

In either case serve with additional Hoisin sauce on the table.

Note: If 5 spice powder is not available you can make your own.

  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground clove
  • 1 tablespoon ground fennel seeds
  • 1 tablespoon toasted whole Sichuan peeper, ground
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground star anise

Stir to combine and store in an airtight jar.

Summer Mixed Beery Galette

Summer Mixed Berry Galette

 

August always reminds me of the beginning of berry season back in the American North East where I come from. Irresistible just picked fresh berries are on display in all the local farmers markets and at roadside farm stands that dot the countryside. A cooks delight to be sure!

What vividly comes to mind is making all sorts of summery mixed berry galettes. This French free form tart is so easy to make you will be find yourself whipping them up not only throughout the berry season, but into the winter months as well using frozen berries that you have put up in your freezer. I have to say, a warm galette coming out of the oven in the dead of winter brings back a taste of summer that is a pure delight that lifts the spirit.

Preparing a batch or two of your favorite flaky tart dough and freezing rounds gets most of the work for making a galette out of the way in advance. The berries require just a bit of sugar, a dash of lemon juice, and a little flour, that is then tossed together. The berries are then placed in the center of the rolled out dough and the edges of the dough are folded over the berries to create a rim. The galette is then baked for about forty minutes and…voila!

Keep in mind this idea works beautifully with any combination of mixed berries as well as berries combined with seasonal fruit as well.

I have included a recipe for a flaky tart dough from Elizabeth M. Prueitt’s TARTINE cookbook which has come to be my very favorite tart dough recipe. It is easy to handle and consistently delivers a perfectly light and flaky crust when baked.

Flaky Tart Dough    makes two 10 to 12 inch tart or pie shells (or double the recipe and freeze dough for later use)

  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2/3 cup very cold water
  • 3 cups + 2 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 10 ½ oz/300 g unsalted butter, very cold

In a small bowl combine the salt and water and stir to dissolve. Refrigerate so it is very cold when ready to use.

To make the dough in a food processor, put the flour in the work bowl. Cut the butter into 1-inch pieces and scatter the pieces over the flour. Pulse briefly until the mixture forms large crumbs and some of the butter is still the size of peas. Add the salted water mixture and pulse for several seconds until the dough begins to come together into a ball but not smooth. You should still be able to see some butter chunks.

On a lightly floured work surface divide the dough into two equal balls and shape each ball into a disk 1 inch thick. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours or preferably overnight.

Preheat the oven to 350 f /180 c with rack positioned in the center of the oven.

Line a large shallow baking tray with parchment paper.

Remove a round of well chilled dough from the refrigerator. Unwrap the dough and place on a lightly floured work surface. Let the dough soften for a couple of minutes before beginning to roll it out.

Then roll the dough out working from the center to the edges into a 12 or 13 inch round. Transfer the dough to the parchment lined baking tray and put it in the refrigerator to chill the dough while you prepare the berries.

Berry Filling     for 1 galette

As most berries are not grown here in the tropics I used imported blueberries and raspberries, and frozen lingonberries, but by all means use locally grown fresh berries when available.

  • 2 cups fresh blueberries
  • 2 cups fresh red raspberries
  • 2 cups other fresh berries of choice
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons granulated sugar or more to taste
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tsp flour
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tablespoon heavy cream or Greek yogurt
  • granulated sugar for sprinkling
  • 1 or 2 tsp corn starch mixed with cold water

Combine the all the berries in a large bowl and add the sugar and toss. Set aside for ten minutes and then drain off any excess juices and reserve to use later. If you are using frozen berries you will have considerably more juices to drain off and reserve. Taste the berries and add additional sugar if needed. 

Once the juices have been drained off add the lemon juice and flour and toss to combine and set aside for a couple of minutes.

Give the berries a final toss and again pour off any excess juices into the bowl of reserved juices.

Gently mound the berries over the center of the dough leaving a generous 2 inches of border. Then fold the dough over the fruit around the edges creating a rim that will retain the juices while baking.

Ideally there will be no leakage of juices, but to be honest that is usually not the case, but not to worry. The parchment will capture any leaked juices that will solidify on the parchment while baking. The parchment can be trimmed off later with a sharp knife before serving.

Mix the egg yolk with the cream (or Greek yogurt) and brush the dough overlapping fruit around the edges of the galette with the egg wash and generously sprinkle with sugar.

Transfer the galette to the oven and bake for 20 minutes. Then turn the baking tray 180 degrees and continue baking another 20 minutes or until the edges of the galette are nicely browned.

While the galette is baking place the reserved berry juices in a small sauce pan and bring to a simmer. Stir 1 or 2 teaspoons corn starch mixed with an equal amount of cold water and slowly stir into the simmering juices. Continue to stir until the juices thicken into a sauce. Taste the sauce and add sugar if needed. Transfer the berry sauce to a small pitcher and set aside to cool.

When the galette has finished baking remove it from the oven and place on a cooling rack. Once cool, trim the parchment paper around the galette and discard. You can then easily transfer the galette to a serving plate.

Serving

Slice the galette into wedges and place on individual dessert plates. As it is summer, vanilla ice cream is the perfect accompaniment, along with some of the berry sauce. Whipped cream is the alternative for fall and winter serving.

                                  Bon appetite!

 

 

Pan Asian Fragrant Roasted Chicken

Pan Asian Fragrant Roasted Chicken

 

A couple of busy days recently left me with very little time for cooking, but a good hearty meal was none the less still very much on my mind. I wanted to put together an easy flavorsome one pot meal that would come to the table with minimum effort but not lacking in attitude. With chicken in the freezer, a pantry stocked with every Asian ingredient imaginable, and many years worth of the tastes of Asia embedded in my memory, I surrendered to the idea of letting the melding of flavors from across the region rule. In this case a base of Thai flavors along with notes from Indonesia, the fragrance of Szechuan pepper, and a splash of a smoky aged tamari soy sauce from Japan to flavor the accompanying rice, brought all the flavors together seamlessly as if it was meant to be. Serendipitous cookery has a kind of kitchen magic that is the very essence of the joys of being a cook!

 

Pan-Asian Fragrant Roasted Chicken   serves 4

  • 1 whole chicken, divided; or 2 legs, 2 thighs, 2 breasts halved
  • 2 inch knob of fresh ginger root, peeled and minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and grated
  • 1 large red shallot, peeled and finely diced
  • 4 green onions, minced
  • 4 coriander roots, smashed and finely chopped
  • juice from 1 large lime
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric powder
  • 1 or 2 teaspoons minced hot red chiles
  • 1 tablespoon sweet soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon light soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 teaspoon Szechuan pepper oil (or chile oil)
  • ¼ cup shao Hsing Chinese cooking wine (or rice wine)
  • ½ cup water + more as needed
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt + more to taste
  • 1 large head cabbage, thinly sliced
  • 1 large onion, peeled and diced
  • fresh coriander leaves as garnish

Prepare the chicken pieces and place in a non-reactive bowl, cover, and refrigerate.

Prepare the marinade at least four hours before you plan to roast the chicken.

In a stone mortar, or large non-reactive bowl, combine the ginger, garlic, shallots, green onions, coriander roots, lime juice, turmeric, and minced red chiles. Pound the ingredients with a pestle, or the back of a wooden spoon, until the combined ingredients resemble a coarse paste.

Then add the sweet soy sauce, light soy sauce, vegetable oil, Szechuan pepper oil (or chile oil) and continue to work the ingredients together until incorporated. Stir in the Chinese cooking wine, ½ cup water, sea salt and stir until well combined. Taste the marinade and add more salt if needed.

Spoon the marinade mixture over the chicken pieces and massage to be sure all the chicken is well coated with the marinade, Press the chicken into the marinade so that it is completely immersed. Add a little water if needed. Cover the bowl and refrigerate for four hours.

Preheat the oven to 375 f/ 190 c

Remove the marinated chicken from the refrigerator 30 minutes before you plan to roast the chicken.

Select a large Dutch oven or deep baking dish.

Combine the sliced cabbage and onions in the Dutch oven, or roasting pan, and toss until well combine.

Place the pieces of marinated chicken over the cabbage and pour the marinade over all. Spread the marinade evenly over the surface. Cover with the lid, or foil, and transfer to the oven and roast for 45 minutes.

Turn up the heat to 400 f/ 200 c

Pan Asian Fragrant Roasted Chicken

Open the oven, remove the lid, or foil, from the Dutch oven and rotate the pan 180 degrees. Roast for another 15 minutes or until the chicken is nicely browned.

Remove from the oven and set aside to rest for 5 minutes

Serving:

Spoon the cabbage onto individual serving plates and top with chicken. Spoon pan juices over all and garnish with fresh coriander leaves.

Suggested (as pictured), serve the chicken with Thai jasmine brown rice (or brown rice) topped with dark Thai riceberry rice (or wild rice). Place the tamari soy sauce on the table. Just a splash of tamari over the rice adds a complimentary deep smoky flavor to the rice which compliments the chicken perfectly!

 

Zucchini is the very essence of summer for me. The shades of deep to light greens along with tinges of yellows tease your memories of endless summer meals gone by where zucchini’s presence on the table defined the taste of unforgettable midsummer meals with family and friends.

Preparation of zucchini is a lesson in less is more. A recipe is hardy required, but keep in mind, a lightness of touch and just a scent of fresh herbs is all that is needed.

Serving this roasted zucchini with a creamy polenta is a match made in heaven! (click here for polenta)

 

 

Roasted Zucchini with a Lemon Vinaigrette

Roasted Zucchini with a Lemon Vinaigrette

 

Roasted Zucchini with a Lemon Vinaigrette     serves 4

Needed: large shallow oven baking tray

Preheat oven to 375 f/ 190 c Have oven rack placed in the middle position.

  • 3 or 4 plump garden fresh zucchini, ends trimmed and cut into ½ inch thick wedges
  • 2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon thyme leaves
  • sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper

 

Place the wedges of zucchini in a large bowl. Drizzle the olive oil over the zucchini and toss to coat the wedges evenly.

Add the lemon thyme leaves, season with salt and pepper and toss until well combined.

Place the zucchini wedges in the baking tray in a single layer. Transfer the tray to the oven and roast for 6 to 8 minutes. Then reverse the tray and roast another 6 to 8 minutes. The zucchini should be very lightly colored and softened, but still firm around the edges.

If you like you can place the try under the broiler for a couple of minutes for added color.

Transfer the tray from the oven to a cooling rack and cool to room temperature.

 

Lemon Vinaigrette

  • 3 tablespoons minced shallot
  • 1 garlic clove, whole, peeled and pressed
  • ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • pinch of sugar (optional)
  • freshly grated Parmigiano (optional)

In a non reactive bowl combine the shallots, garlic clove, lemon juice, lemon zest, white wine vinegar, salt, and pepper. Whisk until all the ingredients are combined.

Combine both oils in a pitcher. While whisking slowly begin adding the olive oils in a thin slow and steady stream while continuing to whisk vigorously. Once all the oil has been added and the vinaigrette has emulsified, taste the vinaigrette and add additional salt as needed. Adding just a pinch of sugar is optional. Cover and refrigerate the vinaigrette until you are ready to serve.

Serving:

Place the roasted zucchini in a bowl and lightly drizzle the lemon vinaigrette over the zucchini, toss, and serve.

As suggested above, serve roasted zucchini along with creamy polenta is a perfect summer meal in itself.

Dusting with Zucchini and polenta with Parmigiano is optional, but a nice compliment.

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