Quick Meals

Thai Stir Fry with rum Marinated Pork loin and Chayote

Thai Stir Fry with rum Marinated Pork loin and Chayote

 

When the hot season, April- June, arrives in Thailand the last thing you want to do is spend much time in the kitchen. With temperatures tipping 40 c/ 104 f daily it is really HOT!

Being a hot country year round Thai cuisine has a unique hot weather appropriateness. Flash cooking fresh ingredients tossed together with assertive flavors and fiery spicy heat is what makes Thai cuisine so universally popular. The capsacin from fiery hot chiles stimulates the release of endorphins in the brain that instantly produces a sense of euphoria, while breaking into a sweat from the heat of chiles has a pleasant cooling effect as well. No wonder everyone loves Thai food!

The recipe that follows is a reinterpretation of a popular Thai stir fry dish; Kra Pao Moo (click here for recipe) . I have upped the ante in this recipe using a Thai rum marinated pork loin and included chayote to the stir fry that adds a fresh crisp element to the final dish.

Chayote

Chayote

Chayote originates from Central Mexico and widely used throughout Central and south America. Chayote was introduced to the old world during the Columbian exchange. From there it was transported through trade routes throughout Asia. Chayote is a member of the gourd family, and favored for its crisp texture and plentiful nutrients. The entire plant is eatable and often included in stir fried dishes throughout Asia. Seek it out! Widely available in Latin and Asian markets in North America as well.

 

Thai Stir Fry with Rum Marinated Pork Loin and Chayote    serves 4

To avoid the heat of the day during the hot season I like to marinate the pork in the morning and refrigerate it for the rest of the day. Prep all the other ingredients in the morning as well and refrigerate. That way the stir frying can be done very quickly in the evening without breaking a sweat!

Marinade:

  • 1 inch knob fresh ginger, peeled, thinly sliced, and diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled, thinly sliced and diced
  • 3 tablespoons minced shallots
  • 3 kaffir/ makrut lime leaves
  • 3 tablespoons light soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup Thai Sang Som rum (or other dark rum)
  • 2 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon palm sugar (or light brown sugar)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 pound pork loin, silvery membrane removed and cut into 3 pieces
  • cold water to cover

Select a non reactive bowl just large enough to hold the pork loin and other ingredients. Place all the ingredients except the pork and water into the bowl and stir to combine. Then add the pork loin and, using your hands, massage the pork with the mixture until covered. Then add just enough water to cover all. Cover the bowl with cling film and refrigerate for 8 hours.

Thai Red Chiles

Thai Red Chiles

Stir Fry:

  • marinated pork tenderloin, thinly sliced into medallions across the grain
  • 2-4 teaspoons oil
    1 onion, peeled, quartered, and thinly sliced
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 1 red bell pepper, quartered, seeds and membrane removed, thinly sliced and halved
  • 2 chayote, peeled, halved, pit removed, sliced lengthwise and cut into bite size pieces
  • 1 or 2 jalapeno chiles, quartered, seeds and membrane removed, cut into thin strips and diced
  • 1-3 Thai red chiles, sliced in half lengthwise, seeds removed and very thinly sliced and then diced
  • reserved marinade
  • ½ cup fresh Thai sweet basil leaves
  • 1-2 tablespoons oyster sauce or to taste
  • stock or water
  • additional fish sauce to taste
  • fresh lime wedges

A steel Chinese wok is ideal for stir frying food very quickly over intense heat. For more information on cooking with a wok (click here)

Heat your wok over a gas burner or charcoal fire and add the oil. Swirl the pan to coat the surface and promptly add the pork medallions and stack them all the way up the sides of the wok. Sear briefly and then turn the pork and continue searing. Once lightly browned promptly remove the pork from the wok and set aside. Total cooking time 2 to 3 minutes max. Reserve the marinade to use later.

Add a little more oil to the wok and add the onions, garlic, and red bell peppers. Toss and stir fry until softened and lightly colored. Then add the chayote and toss to combine. Stir fry for a couple of minutes and then add the jalapenos and Thai red chiles and toss until combined. Then add the reserved marinade and cook for a couple minutes. Taste the chayote. Ideally you want the chayote to retain a refreshing crispness that will compliment the otherwise deeply flavorful stir fry.

Add the basil leaves and toss to combine. Taste the broth and add additional oyster sauce and fish sauce to taste. If the broth has reduced quite a bit you can add a little stock or water.

Finally add the reserved pork and toss until just heated.

Serving:

Just before serving squeeze some lime juice into the stir fry, toss, and you are ready to serve.

Serve with Thai Jasmine rice or, my favorite, Thai Jasmine brown rice. Have a bowl of lime wedges set out on the table as well.

Molettes

Molettes

 

Molletes are a must have for a quick breakfast or a snack on the run just about anywhere in Mexico.

The Mollete is an antequera round bread from the Andalusian region of southern Spain. There the mollete is sliced into halves, spread with with butter or lard, and topped with savory meats and cheeses. The Spanish took the  molette with them to the new world where the Mexicans adapted the idea and made it their own. Molletes are in essence  Mexico’s bruscetta. Usually associated with northern Mexico but molletes are popular throughout the country.

Mxican molettes are made with crusty oval shaped bollilos, also known as pan Frances, that were introduced to Mexico by French Emperor Maxmillion’s cooks. Maxmillio’s reign was short lived. He was executed in 1866, but the Bollilos went on to become Mexico’s favorite bread and sold in panaderieas throughout the country.

Mexican molletes are so easy to make. Slice a bolillo in half lengthwise, butter the cut side and toast until golden brown. Top with refried beans, scatter grated cheese over the top and return to the oven until the cheese has melted. Serve with a salsa fresca and your done.

If the thought of cooking dried beans is putting you off by all means use canned refried beans instead. I have fond memories perfectly delicious canned refried beans on numerous camping trips.

You are probably thinking to yourself, it’s just beans on toast, so what’s the big deal?” Well, you’re just going to have to trust me on this one. This is an addictive taste of Mexico you are going to be making again and again, and again I promise you.

 

Molletes:  serves 4

  • 4 bolillos or other oval shaped crusty rolls, sliced in half lengthwise
  • 2 tablespoons butter at room temperature
  • 1 garlic clove peeled
  • 2 cups refried beans (click here for recipe), or canned
  • 1 ½ cups shredded cheese; a Mexican cheese if available, or provolone,or Monterrey Jack
  • salsa fresca (see recipe below)

Preheat oven to 375 f/ 190 c

Slice the bolillos lengthwise and place them on a baking tray cut side facing upward. Spread butter evenly over the cut side surfaces and transfer the baking tray to the oven and bake until the surface is a light golden brown, about 12 to 15 minutes.

Remove the tray from the oven and rub the garlic clove over the toasted surface. Discard the remaining garlic.

Spread the refried beans over the bollilos generously and top with shredded cheese.

Turn the broiler on in the oven and move the oven rack to the upper position. Place the tray of molletes under the broiler and broil until the cheese is melted and lightly colored.

Serve at once with a spicy salsa fresca 

 

Salasa Fresca with Roasted Radishes  makes about 2 cups

This is a a favorite Salas Fresca with a hint of smoky flavor and earthy heat from the radishes.

Salsa Fresca with roasted Radishes

Salsa Fresca with roasted Radishes

Prepare the salsa at least an hour before serving and chill.

  • 6 radishes, flame roasted
  • 2-3 jalapeno chiles, flame roasted
  • 1 medium size onion flame roasted
  • 4 tomatoes, flame roasted
  • 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt + more to taste

Heat up an outdoor grill or place a grill rack over a gas burner on the stove top.

Place the radishes, jalapenos, onion, and tomatoes over the hottest part of the grill, or flame on the stove top, and grill all until the skin is charred and blistered on all sides. Transfer to a large bowl and cover with cling film and set aside to sweat.

Once cool enough to handle rub or peel away the charred skin of all.

Slice the radishes and then dice and transfer to a non-reactive bowl.

Slice the jalapenos open lengthwise and remove the seeds and veins. Slice into thin strips and then dice, and add to the bowl.

Remove the outer layer of the onion, dice, and add to the bowl.

Slip the skin off the tomatoes and quarter them. Remove seeds, dice. and add to the bowl.

Add the chopped cilantro, lime juice, and salt and stir to combine. Taste and add more lime juice and salt if needed.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

 

Chocolate Oatmeal with Toasted Almonds & Greek Yogurt

Chocolate Oatmeal with Toasted Almonds & Greek Yogurt

 

I resently found myself reading an article in the Bangkok Post entitled “Yes, adults can have chocolate for breakfast” by my favorite NY Times food columnist Melissa Clark. Well, yes indeed…why not? I was in the kitchen early the following morning cooking up Melissa’s recipe which turned out exactly as described and, as always, was absolutely delicious.

In the article Melissa cuts right to the chase. “…there will always be something grey and Dickensian about a bowl of morning porridge. ” Who hasn’t had those very same thoughts while stirring and peering into the saucepan of simmering opaque pasty grey oatmeal. Unless that is you add chocolate.” There is  the game changer!

The idea of mixing grain with chocolate has been around since the Maya and Aztecs’ invented atole. Atole is a warm gruel made with corn based masa harina (corn meal/ flour) flavored with chocolate, panela (unrefined cane sugar), and canella (cinnamon). That said, a chocolate oatmeal is still  a bit of a revelation that turns oatmeal into a much more enticing prospect for breakfast along with some added health benefits a well. Unsweetened cocoa powder is naturally fat free and loaded with antioxidants. Just try to keep the sweetener of choice to a minimum.  Bitter sweet is better than too sweet!

Before continuing, a quick rundown on oats available for making oatmeal. There are steel cut oats, rolled oats, and instant oats. Steel cut means the whole oat groat is cut into smaller pieces. It resembles rice and will have a pronounced bite when cooked.For rolled oats, the whole oat groats are steamed and then rolled to flatten them. Rolled oats will cook faster while still retaining a bite. Quick, or instant, oats are precooked groats that are dried, and rolled. They cook faster, but most of the texture is lost in the process.The cooked quick oatmeal tends to be mushy.

Melisssa’s recipe calls for steel cut oats, but rolled oats are more readily available and work just fine with a slightly shortened cooking time.

To read Melissa Clark’s article and recipe (click here)

 

Brown Butter Chocolate Oatmeal (Recipe; Melissa Clark, NY Times)        makes 4 servings

 

Rolled oats sauted in butter

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 ½ cups steel-cut oats
  • 3 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder, preferably Dutch-process
  • ¼ tsp fine sea salt
  • 4 1/2 cups water, or 2 1/4 cups water and 2 1/4 cups milk
  • Raw sugar, honey or maple syrup to taste

Toppings:

Cream, milk or coconut milk

  • Butter
  • Flaky sea salt
  • Sliced bananas
  • Shredded coconut
  • Sliced dates
  • Sliced avocado

Preparation:

1  In a medium saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat. Let cook, swirling occasionally, until it turns a deep golden brown and smells nutty, 2 to 4 minutes. You’ll know it’s close when the bubbling quiets down as the moisture cooks off. Add oats and saute until they turn golden at the edges, 2 to 4 minutes. Scrape the sauted buttered oats into a bowl and reserve.

2  To the same pot (no need to rinse it out first) add 4 ½ cups water (or half water and half milk) and bring to a boil. Add the cocoa powder and whisk well to dissolve lumps. Whisk in buttered oats and salt.

3  Lower to a gentle simmer. Let cook stirring occasionally until the oatmeal begins to thicken, Then stir more frequently until done to taste, 20 to 30 minutes. Turn off the heat, cover the pot, and let sit for 5 minutes. Check the thickness, thin with boiling water if needed. Stir in sweetener to taste and serve with toppings of your choice.

 

Egg & Olive Sandwich with Pickled Watermelon Rind

Egg & Olive Sandwich with Pickled Watermelon Rind

 

Summer’s soaring heat has already arrived here in Thailand so it’s timely to think about cooling it down in the kitchen with some easy summertime chilled favorites.

You can call me old fashioned, but what came to mind where a couple of dog days of summer lunchtime favorites that my mother used to make up for us when we were kids. Egg and olive sandwiches, pickled watermelon rind, and a tall pitcher of lemon iced tea were all set out on the old Victorian oak kitchen table where lunchtime was always peppered with lots of chatter and wild laughter. Lunch was then topped off with strawberry ice cream cones for all! An hour later we were all running off to the creek for a swim. Those were the halcyon days of summers past!

With the glow of those summer days on my mind I couldn’t help thinking about how beautiful the forms and colors of the ingredients are as I gathered them together while recalling the recipe as I remember it to be. Cooking does have this wonderful narrative that captures your imagination as you work from garden to table. You may well have your very own favorite recipe for an egg and olive sandwich What ever the case, this is a sandwich that may have fallen through the cracks of time, but it is a splendid old time favorite that is well worth a deserved revival.

 

Egg & Olive Sandwich    makes 3 to 4

Chinese celery& broad leaf parsley

Chinese celery& broad leaf parsley

  • sliced white bread (or my preference panini), lightly toasted
  • 4 hard boiled organic eggs
  • 8 pimento stuffed olives, sliced into thin rounds
  • 1/3 cup finely diced young tender celery (or Chinese celery; not to be confused with coriander/cilantro)
  • 2 tablespoons finely sliced broad leaf parsley
  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise + more for spreading
  • ½ teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • sea salt to taste
  • several twists of ground white pepper
  • iceberg lettuce

As mentioned my alternative for white bread is panini, which I like for its soft billowy texture and slight scent of olive oil. 

I have used Chinese celery as blanched young celery is not available in Thailand.

 

Place the eggs in a saucepan and add water to  cover the eggs. Bring to a low boil and simmer for 10 minutes. This will insure that the yolks are soft.

Fill a bowl with water and add ice cubes. After simmering for 10 minutes, promptly transfer the eggs to the iced water bath.

When cool enough to handle, lightly bash the eggs and peel off the shells under cold running water and set aside.

Slice the eggs in half lengthwise, remove the yolks and gently chop them. Place them in a small bowl and set aside.

 

 

Slice the egg whites lengthwise and then slice into thirds crosswise and place in another bowl. Add the sliced olives, celery, and parsley and set aside.

In a small bowl combine the mayonnaise, lemon juice, Dijon Mustard, and salt and pepper. Whisk together until smooth. Taste and adjust seasonings to you liking.

Egg & Olive Salad

Egg & Olive Salad

Add the mayonnaise mixture to the bowl with the egg whites, olives, celery, and parsley and fold the mixture together until evenly coated.

Add the chopped egg yolks to the bowl and gently fold them in with out breaking them up if possible.
Cover the bowl with cling film and refrigerate until you are ready to make the sandwiches.

To assemble the sandwiches lightly toast the bread  or panini slices. Spread a thin layer of mayonnaise on the slices. Place iceberg lettuce on half the slices and top with the egg & olive salad mixture. Top with the remaining bread slice and serve.

As suggested serve with pickled watermelon rind (see recipe here) or pickles of choice.
…and don’t forget the strawberry ice cream cones afterwords!

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